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HomeHealthy EatingEasy Jewish Chicken Soup (option of noodles or matzah balls)

Easy Jewish Chicken Soup (option of noodles or matzah balls)


This easy chicken noodle soup, also known as kosher penicillin, is packed with healthy healing vegetables and herbs. If you swap out the matzo balls (for noodles) at your Seder, it really is the best simple base for authentic matzo ball soup.It pairs perfectly with my fan favorite gluten free Passover brisket (100+ 5 star reviews)!

Simple Jewish Chicken Noodle Soup in a bowl with a spoon

Since my family is not usually responsible for reception Passover customsmatzoh bread soup is usually no Made with gluten-free matzo balls, which meant I was forced to create my own version outside of the holidays to solve my comfort food kosher chicken soup problem.

Luckily my husband and I try to keep a batch gluten free chicken soup It's always ready to drink in the refrigerator, so taking a few extra steps to make a complete chicken noodle soup isn't a terrible challenge. This version cooks relatively quickly and really maximizes the flavor of the vegetables while keeping the chicken pieces rustic and moist.

Place the whole chicken on a cutting board and cut into piecesPlace the whole chicken on a cutting board and cut into pieces
Celery, garlic, carrots, bay leaf, thyme and chicken in potCelery, garlic, carrots, bay leaf, thyme and chicken in pot

What is the difference between kosher chicken soup and regular chicken noodle soup?

Many families have recipes that have been passed down from generation to generation, and the ingredients vary.But here are the key differences between kosher penicillin and matzah soup and regular soup chicken noodle soup You will buy it from the grocery store.

First, I found the celery flavor to be more dominant, meaning there was more celery flavor in the soup base and more chopped celery in the soup itself. Additionally, stock tends to be lighter and clearer. For this reason, I usually don't brown the chicken pieces first, but you are welcome to add more caramel flavor.

Jewish Chicken Soup Step by Step

Whole chicken vs. chicken nuggets

You can use any type of chicken to make kosher chicken soup, but I prefer to buy a whole chicken and break it down myself. For one thing, it's cheaper! But the second reason is so I can save the carcass for future gluten-free chicken noodle soup.

I find dicing raw chicken to be more unruly than throwing a whole chicken into the pot, but you can certainly do the latter. Once removed, it will take longer to cool and mincing the meat will be more troublesome.

The second reason I prefer chunks is that breast meat cooks faster than dark meat. To make sure it stayed juicy and not dry out, I took it out at 45 minutes and let the chicken broth cook with the other chicken pieces for about 15 minutes.

If you don't buy a whole chicken, you can buy a mix of different parts: I recommend at least 2 thighs and 2 chicken breasts (bone-in and skin-on) so you have enough meat to fold back into the soup. Chicken wings and drumsticks are great for bone broth and can simmer for hours (more bones!), but the soup itself doesn't have a lot of meat in it.

A bowl of chopped celery and carrotsA bowl of chopped celery and carrots
Jewish Chicken Soup Base for Passover Seder Matzah Ball Soup in the PotJewish Chicken Soup Base for Passover Seder Matzah Ball Soup in the Pot

While the matzo ball soup my family serves at Seder is mostly broth with some carrots, a bit of chicken, and a ton of matzo balls, this soup is very filling. This way, you can eat it year-round, omitting the noodles or matzah balls, and still feel like you're eating a complete meal.

Gluten-free chicken soup with herbs and add-ins

I've kept this Jewish chicken soup pretty traditional, but if you want to add icing on the cake, additional delicious seasonings include fennel seeds (also great for digestion!), shredded saffron, or sliced ​​fennel bulbs.

To make this low FODMAP recipe, simply omit the garlic, celery, and onions.

Make Jewish Chicken Soup Ahead for Passover

I designed this recipe as a matzo ball soup base. You can start finishing up to a week in advance. But you can also break down the steps: Make the broth one day, then finish the soup by cooking the vegetables the same day. The soup also freezes well.

Jewish chicken soup for the Passover Seder, served with a spoon in the potJewish chicken soup for the Passover Seder, served with a spoon in the pot
Jewish Matzo Chicken Soup for Passover Seder in bowl with spoonJewish Matzo Chicken Soup for Passover Seder in bowl with spoon

Matzo ball or noodle variations

If turning this kosher chicken soup into matzah ball soup, I recommend boiling the matzah balls separately in a pot of salted water rather than cooking them directly in the broth (although that's possible). The reason for this is that during the boiling process the balls double in size, giving you less broth to enjoy as part of the soup.

Making the matzah balls separately also allows you to share the labor (as suggested above) and make the soup ahead of time, then make the balls the same day. Matzah balls can also be cooked and stored separately from the soup. You don't want them to absorb more liquid and become soggy or break down.

In the end, this is what I want my family to do for a restricted diet! If you have someone at your table who doesn't eat gluten, cooking the meatballs separately means they can still enjoy the chicken stock base without contamination.

Simple chicken soup with herbs in bowl and potSimple chicken soup with herbs in bowl and pot
Jewish chicken noodle soup served with a spoon in a bowlJewish chicken noodle soup served with a spoon in a bowl

To make it into a kosher chicken noodle soup, the recipe below explains when to add the noodles. The traditional choice is egg noodles, although I haven't found a gluten-free version yet. For gluten-free chicken noodle soup, use spaghetti cut into small strands, or any short-shaped rice pasta you like cut into small pieces.

For matzo balls, you can reheat them in the soup before serving, or add them directly to the bowl and top with broth.

More gluten-free chicken recipes:

Read on for this delicious kosher chicken soup recipe!

With health and hedonism,

phoebe


A bowl of kosher chicken soup in a bowlA bowl of kosher chicken soup in a bowl

Easy Jewish Chicken Soup (option of noodles or matzah balls)

This easy chicken noodle soup, also known as kosher penicillin, is packed with healthy healing vegetables and herbs. If you're swapping out gluten-free matzo balls (for pasta) at a seder, it really is the best simple base for authentic matzo ball soup. It pairs perfectly with my fan-favorite Passover Brisket (100+ 5-star reviews)! I prefer to start with a whole chicken and break it down myself so I can save the carcass for another batch of gluten-free chicken stock. Since this soup only cooks for an hour, you can easily save all the bones and vegetables for a second use. I usually freeze them together and use them as a base for my next soup. In this recipe we use the vegetables in two ways, first by cutting them in half for soup and then by slicing them into thin slices for soup. For celery, I recommend using the tough outer stems for broth and reserving the tender inner stems for soup base, as they tend to be more flavorful and subtle. See the notes above the post for other potential add-ons for a less traditional Jewish chicken soup.

course Main course, soup

gourmet food American

diet Diabetic, gluten-free, low lactose

Keywords chicken soup

Preparation time 5 Every minute

cooking time 1 Hour

portion size 8

raw material

  • a whole 3 to 4 pounds chicken, divided into portions or 4 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs and 2 bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts
  • 1 medium onion or shallot Peel and cut in half
  • 1 pound radish Makes about 8 medium-sized pieces, divided
  • 1 bunch of celery About 10 stems, divided
  • 1 garlic Horizontal halving
  • 2 bay leaf
  • 4 fresh thyme sprigs
  • coarse salt
  • 1 teaspoon Black pepper
  • 1 A bunch of flat-leaf parsley divided into
  • 1 bunch of dill divided into
  • 4 ounce Kosher egg noodles or regular pasta Divide in half (optional)
  • 1 Batch Gluten-Free Fermented Balls For serving (optional)

instruct

  • Make the stock: In a large (at least 6 quart) stock pot or Dutch oven, place chicken parts in bottom of pot. Add the onion, half the carrot, and half the celery (each cut in half lengthwise), along with the garlic, bay leaf, thyme, 2 teaspoons sea salt, and black pepper. Top with half of the parsley and dill. Reserve remaining herbs and vegetables for later use.

  • Cover ingredients by at least 1 inch with water (there should be at least 12 cups of water).

  • Bring the kosher chicken stock to a boil and then reduce to a simmer. Cook uncovered for at least an hour. At 45 minutes, remove chicken breasts (if using) and set aside. This prevents the white meat from being overcooked. No one likes chicken in matzo ball soup! When the broth is rich in color and flavor (after an hour), use tongs to remove the remaining chicken pieces and set aside with the chicken breasts.

  • Strain the stock through a fine mesh sieve into a second large pot or bowl. If it's the latter, just add the broth back to the original pot. Discard the strained veggies and bones, or freeze them along with the chicken bones to make a stock batch later—they'll still have more flavor!

  • While the broth is boiling, prepare the remaining vegetables: Thinly slice the carrots and celery. Some people prefer rustic pieces, but I prefer a sophisticated look! Then, finely chop the remaining parsley and dill. Set aside.

  • Make the chicken stock: Add the reserved chopped celery and carrots to the strained broth and return to a simmer on the stove. Cook for about 30 minutes more, until the vegetables are tender and the stock is more concentrated. Taste for seasoning and add more salt as needed.

  • Optional: If you are making a kosher chicken noodle soup, add the egg noodles or pasta during the last 10 minutes of the soup cooking.

  • When the chicken is cool enough to touch, use your fingers to lift it from the bone and cut into rustic pieces. Discard skin and bones.

  • To serve, return chicken to broth along with chopped parsley and dill. Ladle soup into bowls. If you are making Jewish matzo ball soup, add 2 to 3 gluten-free matzo balls to each bowl. Garnish with any other herbs, celery leaves or freshly ground pepper. Or, store the soup in the refrigerator or freezer for future sick days or Jewish holidays!

If you make it, tag @phoebelapine and #feedmephoebe – I’d love to see it!





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