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Washington State COVID news, updates, resources and services


About the COVID-19 vaccine

The COVID-19 vaccine can protect you in several key ways:

  • If you are infected with COVID-19, they can greatly reduce your chances of getting a serious illness
  • Completing the vaccine series reduces your chances of hospitalization and reduces the risk of dying from COVID-19
  • They are very effective in preventing COVID-19
  • They increase the number of people in the community protected from COVID-19, making it harder for the disease to spread

Experts continue to conduct more research on the ability of vaccines to prevent people from spreading the virus to others. After fully vaccinated, there is still a possibility of contracting COVID-19, but the chance is much smaller than when it is not vaccinated. You are also unlikely to be really sick or need to go to the hospital. Studies have found that each vaccine is at least 85% effective in preventing severe COVID-19 disease. The vaccine also prevented many people from showing any symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Janssen, 7%
  • Pfizer-BioNTech, 95%
  • Hyundai, 94%

Is the COVID-19 vaccine mandatory?

You can choose whether to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Washington is currently not considering any authorization for the vaccine, but employers may require it. The vaccine will help protect you and others around you from COVID-19, and we encourage you to discuss its benefits with your doctor or clinic.

  • What is the recommended dosage and schedule?
    Pfizer-BioNTech: Pfizer vaccine requires two 0.3 ml (30 micrograms) doses at least 21 days apart.
  • Moderna: The Moderna vaccine requires two 0.5 ml (50 micrograms) doses at least 28 days apart.
  • Johnson & Johnson – Janssen: The Johnson & Johnson vaccine requires a single 0.5 ml (50 microgram) dose.

How long can someone be protected from COVID-19 after being vaccinated?

It takes about two weeks for someone to get the maximum protection after completing the COVID-19 vaccine series.

If the patient is late or missed the second dose, do they need to restart the series?

No need. For patients receiving the two-dose series of COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna), patients do not need to restart the COVID-19 vaccine series, but should receive the second dose (21 28 days of Pfizer) as soon as possible after the recommended number of days, Moderna 28 days) has passed since the first dose. If patients receive a second dose after the recommended time, they will still have a good immune response.

How do we know that the vaccine is safe?

As part of phase III clinical trials in the United States and other countries, researchers collected safety and efficacy data. A total of more than 115,000 volunteers participated in clinical trials of Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson-Janssen COVID-19 vaccines.

Before providing the vaccine here in Washington, the Federal Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices reviewed to ensure that they can safely recommend the vaccine and to whom. In addition, the scientific safety review working group of western countries has put forward opinions on the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine. Both groups voted to recommend the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for people 12 years and older, and Moderna and Johnson-Janssen’s COVID-19 vaccine for people 18 years and older.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will monitor the information reported for possible adverse events related to the vaccine.

Is the vaccine effective for all age groups?

Yes, clinical trials have shown similar results in different age groups, including people over 65.

How does the COVID-19 vaccine work in my body?

The COVID-19 vaccine teaches your immune system to recognize the coronavirus. When you are vaccinated, your immune system produces antibodies (“battle cells”) that stay in your blood and protect you when you are infected with the virus. You don’t need to be sick to get protection against disease. When there are enough people in the community to fight the coronavirus, it has nowhere to go. This means that we can stop the spread faster and get closer to ending this pandemic.

To watch a video on how vaccines work in your body, please visit youtu.be/k7E88xEGOaE.

Is it COVID-19 or a vaccine response?

The COVID-19 vaccination usually has side effects such as muscle soreness or fever. If you develop symptoms after vaccination, you may want to know if it is safe to work or complete your tasks safely. Employers may want to know whether it is safe for employees to return to work. It may take 1-2 weeks after the second injection to get full protection, so if you have been exposed to COVID-19 before then, you may still be infected with COVID-19. It is also important to remember that everyone’s immune system works slightly differently, and the vaccine is not effective for approximately 1 in 2500 people.

go with doh.wa.gov/Portals/1/Documents/1600/coronavirus/820-124-CovidVaccineReactions.pdf Get a chart to help you understand if you are responding to the vaccine, or if you may need to be tested and isolated for COVID-19. If your symptoms disappear within a day or two, it may just be a vaccine reaction. If they continue to exist or you feel you should do so, seek medical advice. If you are at risk of contracting COVID-19 or have been exposed to the virus, please stay away from others just in case.

After vaccination, what types of symptoms are normal?

Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson-Janssen COVID-19 vaccine

Like other conventional vaccines, the most common side effects are arm soreness, fatigue, headache and muscle pain.

These symptoms indicate that the vaccine is working. In Pfizer and Moderna’s trials, these side effects most commonly occurred within two days of vaccination and lasted for about one day. Side effects after the second dose are more common than after the first dose. In Johnson & Johnson’s clinical trials, side effects lasted for one to two days on average.

For all three vaccines, people over 55 are less likely to report side effects than young people.
The clinical trial found that approximately:

Pfizer

  • 80% of people report pain at the injection site
  • 50% report fatigue and headache
  • 30% of people report muscle pain

Modern

  • 90% of people report pain at the injection site
  • 70% of people report fatigue and headaches
  • 60% of people report muscle pain

Johnson & Johnson

  • 60% of people report pain at the injection site
  • 45% reported fatigue and headache
  • 40% of people report muscle pain

You may see some rumors about untrue side effects online or on social media. Make sure to check the source of the claim every time you see a claim about side effects. This video can teach you more about how to determine whether an online claim is true.

What if I get sick after getting the COVID-19 vaccine?

It is normal to have some side effects after vaccination. This may indicate that the vaccine is working. If you experience a medical emergency after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, please call 9-1-1 immediately.

If you become ill after vaccination, you should report the adverse event to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). “Adverse events” are any health problems or side effects that occur after vaccination.

What is VAERS?

  • VEARS is an early warning system led by CDC and FDA. VAERS can help detect problems that may be related to the vaccine.
  • Anyone (healthcare providers, patients, caregivers) can report possible adverse reactions to VAERS.
  • The system has limitations. The VAERS report does not mean that the vaccine caused a reaction or result. This only means that vaccination occurs first.
  • VAERS is designed to help scientists pay attention to trends or causes, and they should investigate possible problems. It is not a list of verified vaccination results.
  • When you report to VAERS, you can help the CDC and FDA identify possible health problems and ensure that the vaccine is safe. If any problems arise, they will take action and notify the healthcare provider of the potential problem.

Are there any restrictions on who can be vaccinated?

Generally, the COVID-19 vaccine should not be vaccinated to anyone under the authorized age or who has a history of severe allergic reactions to the components of the COVID-19 vaccine or previous doses.

Pfizer-BioNTech

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine should not be given to anyone:

  • Under 12 years old, until further research on the use of vaccines in children is possible
  • A history of severe or immediate allergic reactions to the components of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine (such as polyethylene glycol or polysorbate)
  • People who have a severe or immediate allergic reaction to the first dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna)

Modern

The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine should not be given to anyone:

  • Under 18 years of age, until further research on the use of vaccines in children is possible
  • A history of severe or immediate allergic reactions to the components of Moderna vaccines (such as polyethylene glycol or polysorbate)
  • People who have a severe or immediate allergic reaction to the first dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna)

Johnson & Johnson-Janssen

The Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine should not be given to anyone:

  • Under 18 years of age, until further research on the use of vaccines in children is possible
  • Has a history of severe allergic reactions to components of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine (such as polysorbate).



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